ÍS: Snæfellnes and Surrounding Area

reykjanes20

When I returned to Iceland for two weeks last August to participate in a manuscript editing seminar, I brought along my youngest brother, who hadn’t gotten a chance to visit me while I was living in Iceland. After the course was over, we took three or four-day trip to the Golden Circle and all around the Snæfellsnes peninsula. I didn’t take too many pictures since I’d just been through the area a few months earlier with another visiting friend, but here’s what I’ve got!

reykjanes21

reykjanes14

reykjanes22

reykjanes23

reykjanes19

reykjanes25

reykjanes17

reykjanes24

reykjanes18

reykjanes16

reykjanes15 [35mm shot with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of southwest Iceland.]

ÍS: Reykjanes Peninsula

 

reykjanes29 I told you I still had Iceland pictures up my sleeve! I moved back home from Iceland in early June 2015, but I went back for two weeks in August to attend an intensive masterclass on manuscripts. I brought my youngest brother along with me (thus finally getting to explore Iceland with every member of my immediate family individually). I spent most of the time in the reading room of the manuscript institute, but did get out to see a bit of the countryside. These pictures are all from a great day trip the class took through the Reykjanes peninsula in southwest Iceland (the area where Keflavík Aiport is).

reykjanes3

The Reykjanes pensinsual is full of lava fields, tiny towns, sulfurous steam vents, bubbling geothermal spots, and an epic coastline. It was actually one of the few parts of Iceland I had not explored before moving, so it was great to see something new. At this point, it’s been over a year since I moved home, and I will admit I am sorely missing Iceland and Europe in general.

reykjanes26

reykjanes2

reykjanes5

reykjanes13
reykjanes41

reykjanes8

reykjanes12

reykjanes11

reykjanes

reykjanes10

reykjanes9

reykjanes27

reykjanes35

reykjanes34

reykjanes33

reykjanes30

reykjanes36

reykjanes45

reykjanes44

reykjanes43

 

reykjanes40

reykjanes39

[35mm shot with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of southwest Iceland.]

ÍS: Arnastapi Cliffs

snae8Cliffs on the Snæfellsnes peninsula in southwest Iceland.

snae [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures from my May 2015 trip around Iceland’s Ring Road. Click here for more pictures of the Snæfellsnes peninsula.]

ÍS: The Town of Stykkishólmur

iceland2Stykkishólmur is an adorable little town on the northeastern coast of the Snæfellsnes peninsula, situated on a bit of rocky land sticking out into Breiðafjörður, one of the most ecologically diverse bodies of water around Iceland.  With 1,100 inhabitants, it is the commercial center of this part of the Snæfellsnes peninsula. It was settled in the 16th century as a trading post, and today most of the residents make their living off of fishing and tourism. icleand4Stykkishólmur is named after a small island by the harbor called Stykkið (“the piece”- seen in the first in this post). A short walk to the top of Stykkið is rewarded by  a beautiful view of the colorful little town and the thousands of islands in Breiðafjörður. You may be familiar with Stykkishólmur if you saw The Secret Life of Walter Mitty, since the title character ends up in this town at one point. iceland3

iceland5

[35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures from my May 2015 trip around Iceland’s Ring Road. Click here for more pictures of Stykkishólmur.]

ÍS: Kirkjufell

Kirkjufell, Iceland Kirkjufell is one of the most photographed mountains in Iceland. Located on the north coast of the Snæfellsnes peninsula, sailors named it because its unique shape resembles a church from out on the water. In March 2014, I spent a snowy weekend at a cabin on the foot of the mountain with a few friends. You can see the pictures from that trip here. This sunnier shot is from my May trip around the Ring Road.

[35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of Snæfellsnes. Click here for more pictures from my late May 2015 Ring Road Trip.]

 

ÍS: Lava Fields on Snæfellsnes

Lava fields in IcelandOnce the most distinctive features of Iceland’s other-worldly landscape are the lava fields (hraun). The Snæfellsnes peninsula has a number of volcanoes, one of the biggest and most notable being Snæfellsjökull, a stratovolcano at the end of the peninsula that is covered by an icecap. Snæfellsjökull last erupted around 200 ad., but its claim to fame is more recent. This is the volcano through which Jules Verne’s characters travel from the surface to the core in Journey to the Center of the Earth.

Thanks to Snæfellsjökull and company, the western half of the peninsula features some of the most beautiful lava fields in the whole country. You can literally see the path the magma took as if flowed down out of the mountains to the water. 
Lava fields in Iceland

Lava fields in Iceland   [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of Snæfellsnes. Click here for more pictures from my late May 2015 Ring Road Trip.]

ÍS: The Beach at Búðir

Búðir, IcelandAs you approach the the end of the Snæfellsnes peninsula (driving from the bottom side around the top), a small road leads you to the coast, where there is a gorgeous gold sand beach, a beautiful old little church, and fabulous lava formations right up at the water’s edge. If you haven’t visited Iceland, you won’t realize how amazing that sand looks. Most of the beaches in Iceland are actually black or gray, since the whole island is made of volcanic rock. I’m not sure why this gold sand is here, but it makes a gorgeous contrast between the black lava formations and the blue ocean. Búðir, Iceland

These photos are from my late May 2015 trip around the Ring Road with my lovely friend Callie, who is pictured below. You can check out the picture from that go-around on the tag Ring Road Trip 2015. I stopped at Búðir on my Ring Road trip in June 2014 as well. The great thing about Icelandic nature is that it looks so different during every summer month. May, June, July, and August reveal entirely different landscapes. It’s hard to get tired of the beautiful mountains, the moss covered lava, and the pure air.

Búðir, Iceland  [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of Búðir.]

ÍS: The Approaching Storm

Southwest Iceland I’m an amateur photographer. I like to take pictures more than I care about how well they turn out. Usually I tweak and trim my film photography on Photoshop since I don’t have the space to develop them myself. And then there are those rare moments where the lighting is just right and I get my camera settings just right and voila, these two amazing pictures delivered from the developer as is.

These are from my road trip with a friend around the whole Ring Road back in late May. I’m pretty this is in Southwest Iceland, somewhere between Reykjavík and the Snæfellsnes peninsula (since I have been tardy in posting these what with two moves and working again, I’m not going to be able to be as specific about locations as I was for my last set of Ring Road pictures.

Southwest Iceland [35mm film taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of Southwest Iceland.]

ÍS: Hiking up to Glymur

Glymur, Iceland

I made a third trip to Glymur (incidentally the place I shot my first roll of film, starting this whole blog adventure in earnest) in April while my boyfriend was visiting for a few weeks. We rented a car with two friends. The weather on the way there was spectacular, if a little windy, but unfortunately when we got to the canyon, we were faced with strong wind and icy rain almost the entire hike. The river was too flooded to cross on the wire (in the summer there’s a footbridge, but in the winter only a guiding wire that you can shimmy across if you’re brave); in fact, some friends had tried to get across the flooded river on the wire the day before and ended up getting soaked and stuck and having to call Search and Rescue (we didn’t hear about this until after we made our trek). My camera lens got foggy and wet at the top, but it makes for some fun lens effects.Glymur, Iceland
Glymur is the second tallest waterfall in Iceland. The river Botnsá flows from the lake Hvalvatn along a flat area before plunging 196 meters down the cliff. The word glymur means crash/rumble in Icelandic and refers to the enormous sound of the rushing falls. Glymur, Iceland

Glymur, Iceland

000008land

Glymur, Iceland

Glymur, Iceland

000007land [35mm film taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more pictures of Glymur in Iceland]