Sweden: Lund Cathedral & the King’s House

Lund, Sweden The King’s House, the Cathedral, and the beautiful park area in between them. Photos from a solo day trip to Lund, Sweden back in October.

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden [35mm taken with my Canon Rebel 2000 SLR. Click here for more pictures of Lund.]

 

A Stroll Around Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden Back in October, I took the train from Copenhagen over to Sweden to spend the day in Lund. The city is believed to have been founded in 990ad (at that time this province belonged to Denmark). It’s university was founded in 1666, and is still a very respected Scandinavian institution. Lund is really lovely. I visited on a Sunday, so many thing were closed, but I still had a wonderful day strolling around the charming city center. Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden

Lund, Sweden [35mm taken with my Canon Rebel 2000 SLR.]

Old Carlsberg Brewery, Copenhagen

Old Carlsburg Brewery, CopenhagenAs many of you know, I spent last semester on exchange in Copenhagen, Denmark. I lived in Valby, a neighborhood a ten minute bike ride from downtown. There were a lot of neat places around my flat, including the Frederiksberg Castle. One of my favorites was the Old Carlsberg Brewery. I passed this gate every day on my way to Uni. Old Carlsburg Brewery, CopenhagenThe Carlsberg Group began as a single brewery in the mid 1800’s. It’s now the fourth largest brewery group in the world, with 500 hundred different beers produced. J. C. Jacobsen, the founder, was also a philanthropist and art collector. There is an entire museum in Copenhagen devoted to his collection (Ny Carlsberg Glyptotek). These elephants (there are four, two on each side of the gate) represent his four children.Old Carlsburg Brewery, Copenhagen[35mm taken with my Canon Rebel 2000 SLR. Click here to see more of my pictures from Denmark.]

Crossing Iceland’s Interior on F-35

F1000013froad Here are the last of my pictures from summer 2014 in Iceland. Instead of coming back from the Akureyri area on the Ring Road, we took advantage of my friend’s SUV to cut directly across the interior on an F-Road. These rugged gravel roads through the center of the island are only accessible with for seven weeks in the summer and even then only with 4-wheel drive. F1000012froad
The F-35 road takes about 5 hours to drive. It cuts across the Kjölur plateau, passing right between the Langjökull and glaciers, which are two of the largest after Vatnajökull. So, in theory the view should be breathtaking. However, it was grey and rainy when we passed through, so we couldn’t see much beyond the grey, gravelly ground next to the road.F1000018froad
Not too far from the northern end of the road is the Hveravellir Nature Reserve. This is a really cool geothermal spot. They have wooden pathways built around steaming cones, bubbling natural cauldrons, and colorful streams of boiling hot mineral water. The wind up there was brutal, creating huge billows of steam from the hot water. The effect was incredible. There is a small guesthouse for the many people who bike or drive this road. Next to it, there was a really cool hot pot. It’s open to all, and we had a delicious soak, but be warned, there are no changing rooms for non-guests (although there is a bathroom nearby). F1000017froadIn the 18th century, the famous Icelandic outlaw Fjalla-Eyvindur and his wife made camp at this hot spring while they were evading the authorities. There is a monument to him at the site.  F1000014froad

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F1000020froad  [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click this link to see more pictures from this trip up to northern Iceland. ]

Ásbyrgi- the Horseshoe Canyon

F1000020asbyrgiAbout 50 miles east of Húsavík in northern Iceland is a magnificent horseshoe-shaped canyon filled with small willow and birch trees. It is located inside the enourmous Vatnajökull National Park. When we were there in late June, the forest floor was covered with purple and yellow flowers. It’s no wonder legend considers this the capital of the “hidden folk” (huldufólk). An even older legend says that the unique shape of the canyon was created when the Sleipnir, the eight-legged horse of the the Norse god Odin, set one of his hooves down onto the ground on his way somewhere important. F1000023asbyrgiYou can get to the canyon on paved road by going all the way up to Húsavík and around the peninsula on 85. However, if you have an SUV and are feeling adventurous (check and check for us), you can take the beautiful and bumpy gravel road that continues beyond Dettifoss. I don’t think it took much longer than an hour.
F1000022asbyrgiWe just wandered about the serene canyon, enjoying the trees (not a lot of those in Iceland) nestled in between canyon walls reaching as high as 100 meters (328 feet). However, if you’re feeling up to it, you can hike up the rock in the middle of the horseshoe, Eyjan (the island). I’m guessing the view from there would be spectacular. Speaking of which, shooting only from inside the canyon, I didn’t get any shots that really show you how incredible it is as a whole, so click here to see “the view.”F1000007asbyrgi [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click this link to see more pictures from this trip up to northern Iceland. ]