Native American Ruins at Old Stone Fort in Manchester, Tennessee

oldstonefort1

Old Stone Fort in Coffee County, Tennessee (about an hour and some change south of Nashville, also home of Bonnaroo) is not a fort. When it was discovered by white settlers, they mis-identified it as a fort, and the name has stuck. In fact, the stone walls covered in earth works were created by Native Americans in the Middle Woodland Period (1,500-2,000 years ago). The site has been studied by archeologists on and off since the 60’s, but we still don’t know for sure what it was used for. The low wall is build along the edge of a peninsula created by the confluence of two rivers. The placement of the entrance to the large clearing within the wall suggests the area was used for ceremonial purposes.

oldstonefort3

There are some interpretive panels around the site that can tell you more, but they are rather old. You can’t really see much of the wall, since it’s covered in earth and forest growth, but the site itself is a great place to walk around and explore for a few hours. There are a few little waterfalls and you plenty of paths to take you down by the rivers. There are also some ruins from civil-war era mills here and there. Aleksi and I drove down there last spring, and had a grand old time. I highly recommend it if you are looking for a nice half-day trip from Nashville.

oldstone11

oldstonefort10

oldstonefort9

oldstonefort8

oldstonefort7

oldstonefort6

oldstonefort5

oldstonefort4

oldstonefort2

[35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more photos of Tennessee.]

Cherry Blossom Surprise

blossoms1

Back in March, I was surprised and delighted to find that the scrawny little tree in my front yard was in fact a cherry tree. It had some truly lovely blooms, which I captured on one of those strange-light afternoons where the sun peeks out from under the clouds in between bursts of rain. blossoms5

blossoms4

blossoms3

blossoms2

blossoms6 [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more photos of Tennessee.]

Nashville, TN: Our Parthenon Has a Roof, Can Greece Say the Same?

nashville27

FYI in case you didn’t know, Nashville has a full-size replica of the intact Parthenon complete with giant gold statue of Athena. Also there’s a nice art gallery in the basement. So, all-in-all, a lot more going on here than that pile of rubble in Greece. *winky face* This masterpiece of American kitsch was build in 1897, as part of the Tennessee Centennial Exposition, which celebrated the 100th anniversary of Nashville statehood. In 1997, they created the Bicentennial Mall State Park, which is more classier but far less absurdly delightful. [35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more photos of Tennessee.]

Nashville: East Hill in the Snow

snowday4

While we don’t get much snow here in Nashville, last year in early January, we got 7-8 inches in one beautiful morning. Then the sun came out, and I walked around my neighborhood, East Hill, enjoying the crisp air and bright, fluffy snow while it lasted.

snowday3

snowday2

snowday1

snowday6

snowday7

snowday9

[35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more photos of Tennessee.]

Nashville, TN: A Winter Stroll Over the Cumberland River

nashville22

One of my favorite things in Nashville is the John Seigenthaler Pedestrian Bridge over the Cumberland River. When the weather is nice, I cross it in the morning and evening on my bike commute to work. Most recently, I marched across it with 15,000 others to protest the Trump administration. These photos here are from last year around this time, when Aleksi first visited Nashville and we did some exploratory rambling together in bitter cold weather. nashville26

nashville25

nashville24

nashville23[35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more photos of Tennessee.]

Monuments and Memorials in Downtown Nashville, TN

nashville9A few sites in downtown Nashville. Above: My former least favorite and now second least favorite American president, Andrew Jackson. Capitol Hill. Below: The historic Downtown Presbyterian Church. Built in 1848, but the site of a church since 1818. Very iconic double towers worth googling if you are interested in that sort of thing. nashville11Below: A statue at War Memorial Plaza. nashville10
nashville8
Above: My handsome Finnish fella.Below: A war (WWII?) memorial in the Bicentennial Mall State Park.
nashville7

[35mm taken with my Canon EOS Rebel 2000. Click here for more photos of Tennessee.]

Jan 21, 2017: The 15,000 Strong Women’s March in Nashville, TN

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

Yesterday, I had the amazing opportunity to march with 15,000 others for the Nashville Women’s March to protest the planned and already enacted infringements and offenses of Donald Trump’s administration on the rights and dignity of women, African Americans, immigrants, Native Americans, Muslims, Jews, the LGBTQ community, the poor, and everyone else who isn’t rich, white, male, and straight. Here are a few of my favorite iphone photos from the morning.

Processed with VSCO with a6 presetProcessed with VSCO with a6 presetProcessed with VSCO with a10 presetimg_2051

img_1907

img_1921

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

 

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

^Note the magnificent dress pattern in the photo above. 

img_1971

img_2021 img_1980

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

img_2032 img_2045

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

img_2048 img_2049

img_1967

Processed with VSCO with a6 preset

img_1932

img_1892And poor quality, but my very favorite sign of the march.

img_1883