Geysir At Sunset

Geysir, Iceland

Geysir, Iceland

Strokkur is a fountain geyser and the main attraction of Geysir, one of the three natural wonders on Iceland’s Golden Circle. It erupts  every four to eight minutes at a height of fifteen to twenty meters, sometimes even getting as high as forty meters (131 ft).  For more pictures of Þingvellir and Gullfoss, check out some of my older posts.

[These photos are scans of unedited film shots taken by me with a Canon EOS Rebel 2000.]

Cozy Winter Cabin for the Weekend

Near Selfoss, Iceland

Near Selfoss, Iceland

Near Selfoss, Iceland At the beginning of January, eight friends and I rented a cabin near Selfoss to celebrate the birthday of a friend I made in Ísafjörður. It was about an hour drive outside the city, and we arrived at night, and it we woke up in the morning eager to look out of the big windows to see the sun rise over the countryside. We were quite close to all the Golden Circle locations, so we visited Gullfoss, Geysir, and Þingvellir. We ended our Saturday by spending a few hours in a natural hot pot (of course, how else do any of my outside-the-city-stories end).

Near Selfoss, Iceland

Near Selfoss, Iceland

[The photos in this post are scans of unedited film shots taken by me with a Canon EOS Rebel 2000.]

Love and Iceland Are All You Need: A Þingvellir Wedding

A Wedding at Þingvellir

A Wedding at Þingvellir

A Wedding at Þingvellir

On December 29, my classmate Eduardo and his beautiful bride Kendra were married in a perfectly unplanned ceremony at Þingvellir. Þingvellir is a dramatic rift on one side of the valley sitting on the divide between the European and American continental plates. It’s also the site of the medieval Alþingi, the parliament of the great Icelandic chieftains of old.  The day was perfect. It was windless, there was a fresh layer of snow, and the sun was shining (well, more like glowing) the whole time (more pictures from that day here). Kendra and Eduardo were were married by the Sheriff of Selfoss (who happens to be the biggest fan of The Rolling Stones in all of Iceland) on the Lögberg (Lawrock), where the Lawspeaker would recite the laws at every meeting of the Alþingi.

A Wedding at Þingvellir

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Þingvellir in the Winter

Þingvellir, Iceland

Þingvellir, Iceland

Þingvellir, Iceland

Þingvellir, Iceland

Þingvellir, Iceland

A few days after Christmas, a large group of my friends and I piled into cars to drive to Þingvellir for a wedding (more about that in tomorrow’s post). The light at 2pm was perfect, and there was a fresh layer of snow from the night before. I got to drive the eight-seater Ford Expedition there and back, which was a blast. I’ve been to Þingvellir several times, but the attractions of the Golden Circle are most breathtaking in the winter. You can see more pictures of this national park and learn more about its history from two of my earlier posts: here and here.

[The photos in this post are scans of unedited film shots taken by me with a Canon EOS Rebel 2000.]

Karyn is a Viking

Traditional Viking attire

My classmate Karyn has been a Viking Age reenactor for quite few years. She makes much of her authentic medieval attire. Everything Karyn is wearing in these pictures is handmade, even the shoes. You’ll notice her amazing embroidery along the jacket and on the hood; that’s all her work. She brought her small loom to Iceland, and weaves incredible straps with intricate designs. Recently she showed me her latest project, a strap in red silk with real gold ribbon. These pictures are taken at Þingvellir, the dramatic site where the two continental plates meet and where medieval Icelanders would hold a yearly parliament during the Commonwealth.

Traditional Viking attire

Thingvellir, Iceland

[The photos in this post are scans of unedited film shots taken by me with a Canon EOS Rebel 2000.]

Channeling My Inner Lawspeaker At Þingvellir

Thingvellir

Thingvellir sits in the rift valley that marks the crest of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. It’s also the place where the Icelanders established their Alþingi (parliament) in 930. Chieftains and their followers would come from all over the island every summer to argue cases, prosecute grievances, form alliances, and trade news and stories.

The Lawspeaker had a very important role to play. It was this person’s task to recite from memory one third of the law each year so that all the chieftains could hear the entire law corpus once every three years.